COVID-19

OVERVIEW

The year 2020 brought one of the worst pandemics in the history of humankind the COVID-19. The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic presents unprecedented challenges for world citizen’s health and economy. The QSM World stands ready to assist efforts to protect the health, safety, and wellbeing of our employees, our partners, our clients/customers, and the public during this difficult time.

About COVID‑19

An up-to-date rundown of the virus and its symptoms.

COVID‑19 is a respiratory disease caused by coronavirus that can be spread from person to person. COVID‑19 is short for “coronavirus disease 2019.”

The virus is thought to spread mainly between people who are in close contact with one another (about 6 feet) and through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

  1. People are most contagious when they are the sickest. But those who don’t have a lot of symptoms can still pass the virus on to others.
  2. There is currently no vaccine or cure for COVID‑19 but researchers are working to find one.

The most common symptoms are very similar to other viruses: fever, cough, and difficulty breathing.

Common symptoms of COVID‑19 are changing as more is learned about the disease. For the most up to date symptom list, visit the CDC’s website.

  1.  Symptoms may appear 2 to 14 days after exposure and range from mild to severe illness.
  2. If you or someone you know has symptoms, our Screening Tool will recommend best next steps.

Everyone is at risk of getting COVID‑19, but some people are at a higher risk of serious illness.

Generally speaking, adults aged 65 and older and people of any age who have underlying medical conditions may be at higher risk for serious illness from COVID‑19.

  1. The most up-to-date way to assess your risk is to complete our Screening Tool.

 

At this time, pregnant women reportedly have the same COVID‑19 risk as adults who are not pregnant. There is also no clear evidence that a fetus can be infected with COVID‑19 in the womb.

Pregnant women are known to have a higher risk of severe illness when infected with viruses from the same family as COVID‑19 and other viral respiratory infections. This is why pregnant women should take extra precautions to not get COVID‑19. Avoid those who have or who have been exposed to COVID‑19. Wash your hands often. Practice physical distancing. Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily

  1. During this time, it’s normal for care providers to change some prenatal visits to telemedicine.
  2. Ask if your delivering hospital has changed any rules, like if you’ll be asked to wear a face covering while giving birth or if there is a new visitor policy.
  3. Most babies born to people with COVID‑19 are not affected. However, once the baby is born, it is at risk for infection. New parents should take the same precautions to protect themselves from illness as pregnant women.
  4. So far, COVID‑19 has not been detected in breast milk. If you are sick, including with COVID‑19, wear a cloth face covering and wash your hands before each feeding. If pumping milk, do not share your pump with anyone else. Wash your hands before expressing milk or before touching the pump or bottle parts. Follow recommendations for cleaning the pump and parts after each use. If possible, have someone who is not sick feed the baby.
  5. Stay in touch with your care team if you feel sick or develop COVID‑19 symptoms.
  6. Pregnancy and postpartum can be stressful, and COVID‑19 can add to feelings of uncertainty, stress, anxiety, or depression. Talk with your care provider if you are feeling overwhelmed. Seek help if you are in crisis and feel like you may harm yourself or your baby.

Knowing when to see a doctor can keep medical care available for those who need it most.

Most mild symptoms can be treated at home. The most up-to-date way to assess your best next steps is to complete our Screening Tool.

  1. If you need to see your doctor, call the office before you go. Many physicians’ offices are doing virtual visits. They will tell you what to do based on your location.
  2. Testing is limited-availability across the country and is currently being prioritized for healthcare workers, emergency medical service providers, police, and other essential workers, so please consult your doctor for availability in your local area.
  3. If you develop emergency warning signs, call emergency services. Emergency warning signs include: severe, constant chest pain or pressure; extreme difficulty breathing; severe, constant lightheadedness; serious disorientation or unresponsiveness; or blue-tinted face or lips.

What You Can Do

Information about hand-washing, physical distancing, isolating from others, and more.

Washing your hands is the best way to help you stay healthy. Here’s how to do it.

 
  1. Lather your hands by rubbing them together. Get the backs of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails.
  2. Scrub your hands for 20 seconds. Sing “Happy Birthday” twice while washing to gauge your timing.
  3. Rinse your hands under clean, running water. Air dry or use a clean towel.
  4. No soap or water? Use hand sanitizer that contains at least 60 percent alcohol. Apply the gel to the palm of one hand. Rub your hands together over all of your hands’ surfaces and fingers until your hands are dry.
  5. Moisturize your hands to prevent yourself from getting cracked skin.
  6. In addition to washing your hands regularly, it’s also a good idea to avoid touching your face and eyes.

The virus spreads from person to person. Physical distancing means putting space between yourself and people outside your home to prevent the transmission of the disease.

 
  1. Stay at least 6 feet away from people when outside your house. This includes friends or loved ones. Same goes for other people’s pets.
  2. Do not invite guests to your home.
  3. Avoid groups and crowds.
  4. In places where physical distancing might be difficult, like the grocery store or pharmacy, do your best to stay 6 feet away from others. Wear a cloth face covering.
  5. Physical distancing does not mean you shouldn’t talk to others. Make sure you stay connected with your friends, family, and neighbors. Call, video chat, or stay connected using social media.

If you think you might have been exposed to COVID‑19, quarantine yourself. The purpose of this practice is to separate yourself from others and restrict your movement while waiting to see if you become sick.

 
  1. Monitor your symptoms. Contact your doctor immediately if symptoms develop.
  2. Try to minimize contact with others, including household members and pets. Be particularly mindful of staying away from those who are high risk for getting very sick from COVID‑19.
  3. Wash your hands frequently.
  4. If you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue. Discard the tissue and immediately wash your hands.
  5. Avoid sharing personal items such as dishes, towels, and bedding with other people in your house.
  6. Clean and disinfect frequently used surfaces often, like doorknobs and countertops.
  7. Have a household member or friend run errands for you like picking up groceries or prescriptions, or get items delivered. If you do have to go out, practice physical distancing.

If you are sick with COVID‑19 or have symptoms, isolate yourself. The purpose of isolation is to prevent spreading the infection to others by keeping sick people separated from healthy people.

Stay home and monitor your symptoms. If they get significantly worse, contact your doctor immediately. You can leave your house to receive medical care.

  1. Do not leave the house to run errands yourself. Have a household member or friend run errands for you like picking up groceries or prescriptions.
  2. Do your best to stay away from your other household members, including pets.
  3. Ideally, designate a room and bathroom for your use only.
  4. Wash your hands frequently, especially if living with others in your home.
  5. If you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue. Discard the tissue and immediately wash your hands.
  6. Avoid sharing personal items such as dishes, towels, and bedding with other people in your house.
  7. Clean and disinfect frequently used surfaces often, like doorknobs and countertops.
  8. Wash laundry frequently and separately from other household members’ laundry.
  • Wear a cloth mask over your face and nose if you have to be around other people, including those in your home. If you don’t have a mask, improvise. Create a mask from a tightly-woven cotton garment like sheets or a bandana; T-shirt fabric will work in a pinch. If you can’t wear a mask because of difficulty breathing, make sure caregivers wear one around you.

Keep track of your symptoms if you suspect you have COVID‑19, have been around someone who has tested positive for it, or you’ve been diagnosed.

 
  1. Have your medical provider’s contact information on hand.
  2. Keep a log of your symptoms, including your temperature.
  3. If your symptoms worsen, call your doctor to update them and they will tell you what to do next.
  4. You can use our Screening Tool to help you determine next steps based on your symptoms and risk factors.

Commonly used surfaces should be regularly cleaned and disinfected.

 
  1. First, clean dirty surfaces with soap and water. Cleaning will remove dirt and lower the number of germs—but it will not kill germs.
  2. Next, disinfect surfaces to kill germs. Disinfecting after cleaning can further lower the risk of spreading an infection. Most common EPA-registered household disinfectants will work. Or dilute your household bleach with 1/3 cup of bleach per gallon of water.
  3. Wear dedicated gloves for COVID‑19 related cleaning and disinfecting or use disposable gloves and discard them after each use.

Using a cloth mask can protect yourself and others from germs and help slow the spread.

Buy a cloth face mask. If you can’t find one, improvise. Create a mask from a tightly‑woven cotton garment, like sheets or a bandana; T‑shirt fabric will work in a pinch. Ensure your mask has multiple layers of fabric. Tap the button below to view the CDC’s full instructions.

  1. Wear your mask over your mouth and nose. Make sure it fits snugly but comfortably against the side of your face. It should have ear loops or tie in the back.
  2. Wear your mask in public, especially in places where it’s hard to practice physical distancing, like grocery stores or pharmacies.
  3. When you remove the mask, take it off carefully without touching your eyes, nose, or mouth. Wash your hands immediately.
  4. To sanitize your mask, routinely wash it in the washing machine in hot water.
  5. Don’t use a cloth mask on children under the age of 2, on anyone who has trouble breathing, or on someone who can’t voluntarily take the mask off.
  6. Don’t use surgical or N95 masks. Healthcare workers and other medical first responders need these masks for protection.
  7. If you are an essential worker who has been directly exposed to COVID‑19 or has had direct contact with someone known to have COVID‑19, wear a face mask at work for 14 days after exposure.

COVID‑19 Testing

Current guidance on who should be tested and what to expect from test results.

Knowing when to get tested can keep testing resources available for those who need it most.

Your doctor or state or local health department will decide if you should be tested.

State and local health departments have received tests from the CDC. Individual doctors are coordinating testing through public health labs. They are also getting tests developed by commercial manufacturers.

  1. Different providers, states, and local health departments may have different testing recommendations.
  2. Testing is limited-availability across the country and is currently being prioritized for healthcare workers, emergency medical service providers, police, and other essential workers.
  3. If you or someone you know has COVID‑19 symptoms and needs to get tested, call your doctor. They will tell you what to do next.

Testing can identify if you have the virus that causes COVID‑19.

No treatment is specifically approved for COVID‑19. But test results can help you and your doctor decide what to do next.

  1. If you test positive and have mild symptoms, your doctor may advise you to care for yourself at home.
  2. If you test positive and have severe symptoms, your doctor will tell you what to do.
  3. A negative test means you were probably not infected at the time of testing. However, it is possible that you were tested early into your infection and that you could test positive later. You could also be exposed at any time and develop the illness.

The turnaround time for testing varies between testing sites.

 
  1. If your symptoms worsen, call your doctor and tell them your symptoms. They will tell you what to do next.

Supporting Yourself

Tips for keeping yourself physically and mentally healthy.

Eat well-balanced meals. This means lots of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and protein. Try to limit the amount of sugar and salt.

  1. Stay hydrated. Drink water with every meal, in between each meal, and when you work out.
  2. Exercise for at least 30 minutes a day. Walking counts. Many gyms and fitness companies are offering free online classes with no equipment necessary.
  3. Make sure to sleep. Try to get seven to nine hours if possible.
  4. Don’t drink too much caffeine. It can lead to anxiety, insomnia, nausea, and headaches.
  5. You might need to see your doctor for a reason other than COVID‑19. Call, video chat, or email your provider first.

Practice mindfulness, which can help you stay calm. Various meditation apps are offering free services and specific COVID‑19 programming.

  1. It’s important to unplug. Take short timeouts during the day to recharge. Schedule longer breaks for fun or relaxing activities.
  2. Stimulate your brain. Read a book, do a puzzle, or paint a picture. Or use this time to start something you’ve always wanted to do.
  3. Exercise, stretch, or take walks outside while practicing physical distancing. Movement can raise your level of endorphins, the chemicals that promote a positive mindset.
  4. Reach out to your family, friends, and others in your community with a text, phone call, or video chat.
  5. Start a gratitude journal. Take time to acknowledge the little things that make you happy.
  6. Take breaks from the news and social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
  7. Seek help if things get overwhelming, such as if you’re drinking more than usual or using drugs, excessively worrying, or compulsively checking your temperature or washing your hands.

Limit your trips to the grocery store or pharmacy as much as possible. When you go, try to only buy what you need to be sure there’s enough for everyone else.

  1. People who are at higher risk of severe illness, such as those aged 65 or older or individuals with an underlying medical condition, should try to get food and medications delivered. If delivery is not possible, ask a lower risk family member or friend to run errands for you. Or check local stores to see if they have special shopping hours for high risk customers.
  2. Wear a cloth mask. Wipe down your cart or basket before using it. Don’t touch your face while shopping.
  3. You want to be well prepared, but leave enough for others. A good rule of thumb is to get two weeks worth of groceries and supplies. Buy long-lasting foods, like dry, canned, or frozen foods. You can still purchase fresh produce, meat, and dairy. Just eat those items first or freeze them so they don’t spoil.
  4. Gather essential over-the-counter supplies like tissues, a fever reducer, and cough medicine. Buy a two-week supply of household items like soap, toiletries, and laundry detergent.
  5. Practice physical distancing rules while shopping or getting deliveries.
 

If you’re able to work from home, maintain a schedule and stick to it.

  1. Avoid working in bed or on the couch. If possible, create a separate workspace.
  2. Take walks (while maintaining a physical distance) to make up for the steps you usually take to get to and from work.
  3. If you have children at home, communicate your child-care needs to your supervisor.
  4. If you aren’t working from home, follow the proper steps for hand-washing, cleaning and disinfecting, and symptom-monitoring.
  5. If you live with someone who goes into work, ensure they properly wash their hands as soon as they get home. Disinfect anything they touched before they washed their hands.
  6. If you’re out of work because of coronavirus, know your options for unemployment and explore local community programs. Call your mortgage, student loan, utility, and credit card providers and let them know your situation.

If you’re able to work from home, maintain a schedule and stick to it.

  1. Avoid working in bed or on the couch. If possible, create a separate workspace.
  2. Take walks (while maintaining a physical distance) to make up for the steps you usually take to get to and from work.
  3. If you have children at home, communicate your child-care needs to your supervisor.
  4. If you aren’t working from home, follow the proper steps for hand-washing, cleaning and disinfecting, and symptom-monitoring.
  5. If you live with someone who goes into work, ensure they properly wash their hands as soon as they get home. Disinfect anything they touched before they washed their hands.
  6. If you’re out of work because of coronavirus, know your options for unemployment and explore local community programs. Call your mortgage, student loan, utility, and credit card providers and let them know your situation.

Stay home and monitor your symptoms. If they get worse, contact your doctor immediately. Leave your house only to receive medical care.

  1. Do your best to stay away from your other household members, including pets.
  2. If possible, designate a room for your use only. Ideally use your own bathroom, too.
  3. Wash your hands frequently.
  4. If you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue. Discard the tissue and immediately wash your hands.
  5. Avoid sharing personal items such as dishes, towels, and bedding with other people in your house.
  6. Regularly clean and disinfect frequently used surfaces, particularly door knobs, faucet handles, and counter tops.
  7. Wash laundry frequently.
  8. Have a household member or friend run errands for you like picking up groceries or prescriptions.
  9. Wear a cloth mask over your face and nose if you have to be around other people, including those in your home. If you don’t have a mask, improvise. Create a mask from a tightly-woven cotton garment, like sheets or a bandana; T-shirt fabric will work in a pinch. Don’t use a cloth mask on children under the age of 2, anyone who has trouble breathing, or on someone who can’t voluntarily take the mask off, but their caregivers should wear one.
  10. If you have questions about your best next steps, complete our Screening Tool.

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